Ways to supplement your income

If your childminding hours allow, you might consider exploring some other revenue streams to supplement your income and utilise your skills. Here are some suggestions to think about:

Lunchtime supervisor

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Business model

A lunchtime supervisor provides support to a primary, secondary or special education school during the lunch period each day. This role involves supervising the children to ensure their safety, as well as helping to clear away after lunch.

Qualities required 

Love of working with children, confidence in ensuring safety and wellbeing, flexible, reliable, enthusiastic, communication skills.

Training required 

No formal training or qualifications are required to be a lunchtime supervisor or break assistant.

If you're not sure yet...

You could volunteer for other roles at a local school, such as helping the children with reading or lunchtime activities. Check to see if local schools are advertising to find out the type of role and salary being offered in your local area.

Typical working hours

Hours vary depending on the school’s requirements. However, roles typically involve working two hours a day during termtime. Hours may be extended during COVID, as lunchtimes may be staggered.

Location 

Lunchtime supervisors work on the school premises, usually in the school hall and playground.

Regulatory requirements

Lunchtime supervisors require an enhanced DBS check. Having a valid paediatric first aid certificate is also helpful for this role.

Projected income 

Salaries vary depending on the area, school and number of hours required. Hourly rates are typically between around £8 and £12 an hour.

Family support worker

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Business model

Family support workers offer practical and emotional help to families in need of support. Roles are likely to involve working with other agencies to meet the family’s needs.Some family support worker roles are full time, but there may be part-time roles available as well as opportunities for sessional work.

Qualities required 

Kindness, compassion, patience, empathy, the ability to deal with sensitive issues, communication and organisation skills, a flexible approach to working with a variety of situations and challenges, the ability to work in partnership with other agencies. 

Training required 

You would need a driving licence and your own vehicle to visit families. Family support work requires knowledge of safeguarding and experience of working with families. Some roles may require experience of working with children who have additional needs. Family support roles require a relevant level 3 qualification such as childcare, counselling, education, health, social care or youth work.

If you're not sure yet...

You could look into opportunities for sessional family support work in your area. This might involve supporting a school, family or respite care team. Speaking with potential employers will give you the opportunity to find out about the roles available and experience needed for each job. 

Typical working hours

Family support roles can be full time, but there may also be part-time or sessional roles available that could fit around your childminding business.

Location 

Work can take place in a family’s home, at a school or a respite care facility. This type of work may also involve travelling to offices to complete paperwork, and to meet with other agencies working with the family.

Regulatory requirements

Family support workers must have an enhanced DBS check.

Projected income 

Family support worker salaries range from around £18K to £24K. Sessional family support work typically pays between £8 and £15 per hour.

Playworker

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Business model

Playworkers support children by planning, organising and facilitating play opportunities. Playworker roles may be available at a number of settings including schools, youth clubs, creches, play groups or out-of-school clubs.

Qualities required 

An understanding of the importance and principles of play. A love of working with children. Patience, enthusiasm, empathy, creativity, flexibility, communication skills, organisation skills.

Training required 

Playwork qualifications range from Level 2 to Level 5. Some roles may require the candidate to have a playwork or childcare qualification, while others may provide training as part of the job.   

If you're not sure yet...

You could volunteer in a playwork role to begin with, to see if it fits around your childminding business.

Typical working hours

Hours depend on the type of playwork you do. For example, you might find this type of work at a playgroup, creche, school or out-of-school club.

Location 

Playwork can be based at a variety of indoor or outdoor locations, including children’s centres, schools, church halls, community centres or playgrounds.

Regulatory requirements

Playworkers require DBS checks before starting paid or voluntary roles.

Projected income 

The hourly rate for playwork is typically between around £8 and £14 an hour.

Nanny

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Business model

Working as a nanny usually involves taking up an employed position within a family’s home. However, nannies who work for more than two families at the same time, or work in a number of temporary roles, can be self-employed as a registered childminder. Find out more about becoming a nanny.

Some nannying roles also require the individual to help around the home. Find out more about the role of a nanny.

Qualities required 

Love of working with children, confidence, empathy, flexibility, creativity, reliability, good communication skills.

Training required 

All nannies should have completed paediatric first aid training. Nannies are not required to have childcare qualifications unless they join Ofsted’s voluntary register. As a registered childminder, you already have the qualifications, training and experience that many parents would be looking for.

If you're not sure yet...

You could try some ad-hoc childcare such as babysitting for one of the families you already work with to see how you feel about working in someone else’s home. 

Typical working hours

A nanny would usually be employed by the family and receive a salary. This would involve negotiating a contract, including working hours, with the family. Think about whether you are happy to work irregular hours, such as evenings and weekends.

Location 

Nannies work in the family’s home and would also take the children on outings with parents’ permission, as you do with your childminding business.

Regulatory requirements

All nannies should have a DBS check, up to date first aid certificate and insurance that covers working in someone else’s home. Check government guidance on working safely in someone else’s home during coronavirus.

 

Projected income 

Nannying roles vary depending on your level of experience, the family or families you’re working for, and the area you live in. Nannies typically earn between around £10 and £14 an hour.

Becoming an employee would mean that you are entitled to benefits such as holiday pay. However, if you work for more than two families at the same time, this would come under your role as a self-employed registered childminder. If you do take on a salaried role alongside your childminding business, be sure to update HMRC. 

Forest school practitioner

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Business model

Forest school is an outdoor learning approach inspired by the Scandinavian education system. Sessions take place in a natural environment, strengthening the relationship between the learner and the natural world and offering children the opportunity to take supported risks. 

Forest school leaders plan and facilitate each forest school session. They also risk assess, ensuring that outdoor areas and resources are suitable and maintained.

Forest school assistants help with the practical running of each forest school session and the maintenance of equipment.

Qualities required 

Love of working with children, a love of the outdoors, confidence in ensuring safety and wellbeing, imagination, enthusiasm and good communication skills.

Training required 

Forest school leaders must have a level 3 forest school qualification. Forest school assistants must have a level 2 forest school qualification. The great news is that as a qualified childcare provider, you’ll already meet some other requirements such as experience of working with children and an enhanced DBS certificate.

If you're not sure yet...

There is a level 1 forest school training course. This is aimed at anyone over the age of 16 who is interested in the forest school approach. The course introduces participants to the ethos and practicalities of forest school learning.

Typical working hours

Many forest school practitioners are employed on a fulltime basis by a group childcare setting or school. However, there are also plenty of freelance opportunities such as running weekly sessions at primary schools or out-of-school and holiday clubs.

Location 

Forest schools don’t need to have access to vast forests and woodlands; they can take place in a field, on the school grounds or by the beach. As long as you have the required permission to use the land; plenty of outdoor space; some trees; and natural resources for the children to learn with.

Regulatory requirements

Forest schools must be registered with Ofsted, even if there is no building and the children learn outdoors only. As well as registering with Ofsted, forest school practitioners require enhanced DBS checks and a paediatric first aid certificate that covers outdoor incident management. If food is cooked or provided, practitioners require a food safety certificate that covers outdoor settings.

Projected income 

Forest school practitioner salaries vary, depending on your level of qualification and experience, and whether the role is employed or freelance. Fulltime employed roles range from around £16K to £35K, depending on the type of role and level of experience. As a freelance forest school practitioner, you could expect to earn between £8 and £25 an hour.

Babysitter

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Business model

We know that registered childminding is far from babysitting. However, parents should require the same highly qualified professional when looking for childcare in their own home. If you provide ad-hoc babysitting services in a family’s home, you would remain self-employed. 

Qualities required 

Love of working with children, confidence, empathy, flexibility, creativity, reliability, good communication skills.

Training required 

In the UK, there’s no legal requirement to have qualifications or DBS checks in order to provide ad-hoc babysitting services (although anyone over 16 can request a standard check). However, as a registered childminder, your childcare training, first aid certificate and DBS certificate make you the perfect choice.

If you're not sure yet...

You could try providing babysitting services to one of the families you already work with if they are currently in need of ad-hoc childcare.

Typical working hours

This type of work is short-term and ad-hoc, so you could accept jobs that would fit around you, your family commitments and your childcare business.

Location 

Babysitting is always in the family’s home.You could work with several families as you’d still be working on a self-employed basis.

Regulatory requirements

There is specific government guidance on coronavirus and working in someone else’s home - www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/homes

Projected income 

Babysitting is ad-hoc, so you can set your own rate and choose how much or little work you would like to take on. Babysitting rates often depend on the area you live in and the number of hours required overall. Hourly rates may vary between around £6 and £12 per hour.

Teaching assistant

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Business model

Teaching assistants support class teachers with supervision, planning, tutoring and paperwork. Some teaching assistants work specifically with a child or children with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND).

Qualities required 

A love of working with children. Enthusiasm, empathy, compassion, motivation, creativity, communication skills, organisation skills.

Training required 

Each school sets their own requirements, and this will depend on the teaching assistant level. Some schools offer training on the job.

If you're not sure yet...

Why not consider applying to be a lunchtime supervisor first? This could fit well around your childminding business and help you to decide whether a teaching assistant role is right for you.

Typical working hours

Monday to Friday, during term-time. Working days are often based around the core hours of 8am to 4pm. However, there can be part-time roles available.

Location 

Primary, secondary or special education schools. Some TA roles are based within a specific class, while some may support children across the whole school or year group.

Regulatory requirements

Teaching assistants require an enhanced DBS check.

Projected income 

Teaching assistant roles vary from first level to high-level roles. Salaries vary from around £16K to £26K depending on the teaching assistant level required, qualifications, experience and area you work in.

If you’re considering working in other people’s homes as a supplement to your childminding business, be sure to follow the government advice on working in other people’s homes.